Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > PAST ISSUE

On the Cover

November-December 1998 Volume 86, Number 6

A single stroke of lightning, such as this example in eastern Colorado, may transfer from cloud to ground a charge amounting to hundreds of thousands of amperes within a few microseconds. Where does this charge come from in the first place? ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

How Plants Produce Dioxygen

Veronika Szalai, Gary Brudvig

At its core, oxygen production comes down to the chemistry of a poorly understood manganese-containing complex in the membranes of plant chloroplasts


The Lancelet *

M. Dale Stokes, Nicholas Holland

Also known as "amphioxus," this curious creature has returned to the limelight as a player in the phylogenetic history of the vertebrates


The Mystery of Cloud Electrification *

Robert Black, John Hallett

How precipitation develops, evolves and is moved by airflow at different levels may explain hurricanes' lack of lightning


Elasticity in Arteries *

Robert Shadwick

A similar combination of rubbery and stiff materials creates common mechanical properties in blood vessels of vertebrates and some invertebrates


* access restricted to members and subscribers


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Identity Crisis

Brian Hayes

Equality is more complex than it first appears

MACROSCOPE

Academically Correct Biological Science

Steven Vogel

Do the life sciences unfairly favor "expensive" research?

MARGINALIA

Museums: Dilemmas and Paradoxes

Keith Stewart Thomson

Reflections from the director of Oxford's Museum of Natural History

ENGINEERING

New and Future Bridges *

Henry Petroski

Spans worthy of attention: an international survey

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Printing Plastic Transistors

Mike May

Trading high conductivity for ease of manufacturing

The Proof Is in the Packing

Dana Mackenzie

What's the densest way to pack spheres together?

FROM THE PRESIDENT


Subscribe to American Scientist