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On the Cover

November-December 2002 Volume 90, Number 6

Fallen leaves on a forest floor show the varied autumn colors of trees common in the eastern United States. The yelow leaves get their tint from the loss of chlorophyll, but the red and brown leaves' colors arise from the accumulation of pigments called anthocyanins during senescence. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Managing the Environmental Legacy of U.S. Nuclear-Weapons Production

Kevin Crowley, John F. Ahearne

Although the waste from America's arms buildup will never be "cleaned up," human and environmental risks can be reduced and managed


Why Leaves Turn Red

David Lee, Kevin Gould

Pigments called anthocyanins probably protect leaves from light damage by direct shielding and by scavenging free radicals


Science as Theater *

Kirsten Shepherd-Barr, Harry Lustig

From physics to biology, science is offering playwrights innovative ways of exploring the intersections of science, history, art and modern life


Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Polarized Gases *

Stephen Kadlecek

Although conventional MRI cannot track inhaled or dissolved gases in the body, physicians may soon be able to do so using specially prepared atoms


The Origin of the Solar Wind *

Richard Woo, Shadia Habbal

A novel way of looking at the solar corona reveals a hidden "imprint" of the Sun


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

Earth Architecture

Stephen Lekson

A review of Cahokia: Mirror of the Cosmos, by Sally A. Kitt Chappell

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Science on the Farther Shore

Brian Hayes

Robert Adrain's travails in the mathematical backwater of 19th-century America

MACROSCOPE

Keeping Out of the Box

Stephen H. Schneider

A climate scientist discusses how to deal with the press

MARGINALIA

A Worm's View of Human Evolution

Pat Shipman

Tapeworm genetics reveals the eating habits of early hominids

ENGINEERING

Dorton Arena: On the occasion of its 50th anniversary and its dedication as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark *

Henry Petroski

The pioneering engineering behind Raleigh's innovative stadium

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Climbing Gear for Bacteria

Michael Szpir

E. coli has engineered a clever means of sticking to tissue

A Burning Question

David Schneider

When was the first scramjet flight-tested?

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Groundhog Day Science

Mathematics and the Market

FROM THE PRESIDENT


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