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On the Cover

May-June 1999 Volume 87, Number 3

The elusive particles called neutrinos interact so rarely with matter that enormous volumes of water and extremely sensitive instruments are required to detect them. The oscillation of neutrinos (and hence proof that they have mass) was demonstrated recently by physicists working at the Super-Kamiokande detector in Japan and is described by Kenji Kaneyuki and Kate Scholberg in "Neutrino Oscillations." ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

The New Science of Finance *

Don Chance, Pamela Peterson

The study of how people acquire and invest money has a number of intriguing links with the more traditional scientific disciplines


Neutrino Oscillations

Kenji Kaneyuki, Kate Scholberg

Always elusive, Fermi's "little neutral one" turns out to be a quick-change artist as well, offering answers and new questions for physics and cosmology


Light-Reflection Strategies *

Andrew Parker

Natural selection has produced a wealth of surfaces that interact efficiently with light. Technological applications abound, from better windows to Stealth


Gene Therapy

Eric Kmiec

Investigators have been searching for ways to add corrective genes to cells harboring defective genes. A better strategy might be to correct the defects


Millipeds *

William Shear

These "thousand-legged" arthropods are little known but appear to hold many secrets for scientists


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

Pennock's Primer for Defending Science

Peter Bowler

A review of Tower of Babel: The Evidence against the New Creationism, by Robert T. Pennock.

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Seeing between the Pixels

Brian Hayes

Our dot-dominated world—and some alternatives

MACROSCOPE

Iceland, Blood and Science

Paul R. Billings

How to reconcile cultural norms with international biotechnology?

MARGINALIA

The Coelacanth: Act Three

Keith Stewart Thomson

Our murky understanding of a slippery fish

ENGINEERING

Work and Play *

Henry Petroski

Many a modern engineer has an Erector set in the attic

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Shedding Light on Dolphins

David Schneider

Glowing phytoplankton aid in a study of speed

Addicted to Logic

Dana Mackenzie

Minesweeper in the logic classroom

Globe Watching

Michael Szpir

How to view Earth from a million miles away

FROM THE PRESIDENT


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