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On the Cover

March-April 2000 Volume 88, Number 2

On April 25, 1998, the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer satellite captured this dramatic view of a 370,000-kilometer-wide solar prominence in ultraviolet light of three wavelengths: 171, 195 and 284 angstroms (shown, respectively, by blue, green and red colors). The huge luminous arches mark where concentrations of hot, ionized gas jut from the sun's surface. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Foams and Honeycombs

Erica Klarreich

For centuries, the precise architecture of soap foams has been a source of wonder to children and a challenge to mathematicians


Tracking Down a Cheating Gene

Barry Ganetzky

Some genes will play dirty to gain a selective advantage


What Do Animals Think About Numbers?

Marc Hauser

Many animals have basic numerical abilities, but some experiences can transform their minds and ultimately change how they think about numbers


Simulating Solar Prominences in the Laboratory *

Paul Bellan

The techniques used to advance fusion research can be fruitfully applied to some basic problems in astrophysics


Electroshock Revisited

Max Fink

Electroconvulsive therapy, once vilified, is slowly receiving greater interest and use in the treatment of mental illness


* access restricted to members and subscribers


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Graph Theory in Practice: Part II

Brian Hayes

Building models to understand graph structure

MACROSCOPE

The Brutal Ape vs. the Sexy Ape?

Craig B. Stanford

Bonobos and chimps reflect the bright and dark sides of human nature

MARGINALIA

Eclipse Vicissitudes:Thomas Edison and the Chickens

J. Donald Fernie

The young inventor chases an eclipse in the Wyoming Territory

ENGINEERING

Why 'The Pencil'? *

Henry Petroski

On its anniversary, a look back at a seminal book

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Extremophilic Terraforming

Rebecca Sloan Slotnick

Might bacteria prepare Mars for human habitation?

Heard It on the Radio

David Schneider

Navy receivers record a wallop to the ionosphere

FROM THE PRESIDENT


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