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On the Cover

March-April 2001 Volume 89, Number 2

Public concerns about bioengineered plants have focused largely on direct threats to human health. In "Ecology of Transgenic Crops," however, Michelle Marvier argues that there are also potential threats to the environment and that these threats are not being adequately assessed; indeed, measuring the risk is inherently difficult. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Ecology of Transgenic Crops

Michelle Marvier

Genetically engineered plants might generate weed problems and affect nontarget organisms, but measuring the risk is difficult


Biocavity Lasers *

Paul Gourley, Darryl Sasaki

In a new kind of laser, human cells take part in amplifying light—revealing secrets important in medical diagnosis


Thermoelectric Clathrates *

George Nolas, Glen Slack

Cagelike crystals may soon help to pump heat with electricity and to create electricity with heat


Gene Therapy for Pain *

Jay Yang, Christopher Wu

Will future treatments for one of medicine's most intractable problems include the new genetic technologies?


Protecting Ourselves from Food

Paul Sherman, Samuel Flaxman

Spices and morning sickness may shield us from toxins and microorganisms in the diet


* access restricted to members and subscribers


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

How to Count

Brian Hayes

Peano arithmetic, Hamming cliffs and other perils

MACROSCOPE

The Soul of the Ape

Clive D. L. Wynne

Are the nonhuman apes self-aware?

MARGINALIA

In Search of Better Skies:Harvard in Peru, II

J. Donald Fernie

Further adventures in establishing a 19-century observatory

ENGINEERING

Bath Iron Works *

Henry Petroski

Inside a historic Maine institution

FROM THE PRESIDENT


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