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On the Cover

January-February 1999 Volume 87, Number 1

Soils contaminated with lead are the legacy of decades of use of lead additives in gasoline and paints. In many of America's inner cities, soil lead is most concentrated where children are apt to play—in the yards and play areas around their houses, particularly if those houses are near heavy automobile traffic. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Lead in the Inner Cities *

Howard Mielke

Policies to reduce children's exposure to lead may be overlooking a major source of lead in the environment


Foraging by Seabirds on an Olfactory Landscape *

Gabrielle Nevitt

The seemingly featureless ocean surface may present olfactory cues that help the wide-ranging petrels and albatrosses pinpoint food sources


Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining

Carla Brodley, Terran Lane, Timothy Stough

Computers taught to discern patterns, detect anomalies and apply decision algorithms can help secure computer systems and find volcanoes on Venus


Rocks at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site *

Harry Y. McSween,Jr., Scott Murchie

Chemical analyses and spectral images of Martian boulders allow inferences about their origins


Molecular Conservation Genetics

Mary Ashley

Tools for assaying the structure of DNA prove valuable in protecting endangered species


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

Strange Animal

Tim Tokaryk

A review of The Garden of Ediacara: Discovering the First Complex Life, by Mark A. S. McMenamin.

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

E Pluribus Unum

Brian Hayes

Simulating herds, flocks and schools

MACROSCOPE

No Talking in the Corridors of Science

John L. Locke

How will electronic communication affect the traditions of science?

MARGINALIA

A Really Moving Story

Roald Hoffmann

Developing pictures of molecular motion

ENGINEERING

Fazlur Khan *

Henry Petroski

Pioneer of the "tube concept of design"

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Wrangling Over Refuge

Thomas R. Hargrove

Should we protect some pests to prevent their mutation?

Not-So-Mighty Mice

William Cannon

Enlisting rodents to reduce heart attacks among human athletes

FROM THE PRESIDENT


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