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On the Cover

January-February 2001 Volume 89, Number 1

Computer-enhanced light micrograph shows three of the chromosomes contained in the nucleus of a human cell. Advances in genetic research revolutionized biology over the past century and promise to dominate science and social debate in this one, a development not lost on book publishers and authors. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

The Growing Threat of Biological Weapons

Steven Block

The terrorist threat is very real, and it's about to get worse. Scientists should concern themselves before it's too late


In Defense of Robert Andrews Millikan *

David Goodstein

The creator of the famous oil-drop experiment for measuring the electron's charge has been criticized for his treatment of students, women, Jews--and even data


Superflares and Giant Planets *

Eric Rubenstein

From time to time, a few sunlike stars produce gargantuan outbursts. Large planets in tight orbits might account for these eruptions


Vertebrate Biology in Microgravity *

Richard Wassersug

Basic questions about how complex organisms respond to spaceflight and microgravity can only be answered by long-term study


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

Protector Genes

Victor McKusick

A review of Genes and Resistance to Disease, edited by Viktor Boulyjenkov, K. Berg and Yves Christen.

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

COMPUTING SCIENCE

The Weatherman

Brian Hayes

The first attempts to forecast weather by numerical methods

MACROSCOPE

Requiem for a Great Observatory

Stefan Dieters

Was NASA right to doom the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory?

MARGINALIA

Thermophiles in Kamchatka

Roald Hoffmann

Strange life in Russian hydrothermal pools

ENGINEERING

Twin Bridges *

Henry Petroski

A look at the paired spans traversing Maine's Kennebec River

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Night Lights

Aili Petersen

The effect of urban light pollution on pond life

An Alien Cityscape

Michael Szpir

A radar topographer's view of New York City

To Sleep, Perchance to Sing

Michael Szpir

Zebra finches may rehearsein their sleep

Fossil Hunting, by Radar

Rebecca Sloan Slotnick

Remote sensing may detect dinosaur remains from the air

FROM THE PRESIDENT


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