Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > PAST ISSUE

On the Cover

September-October 2014 Volume 102, Number 5

Detail from the microetching Chaotic Connectome (2013), by Greg Dunn and Brian Edwards, offers a glimpse of the intricate network of neurons in the cerebral cortex...


FEATURE ARTICLES

A Threat to New Zealand's Tuatara Heats Up *

Kristine L. Grayson, Nicola J. Mitchell, Nicola J. Nelson

This unique outlier in the reptile class produces excess male offspring when temperatures rise, presenting a confounding conservation challenge.


Master of Missing Elements *

Eric R. Scerri

Henry Moseley’s discoveries sorted out the periodic table and transformed how scientists look for new forms of the most basic substances


What's in a Grasp?

David A. Rosenbaum, Oliver Herbort, Robrecht van der Wel, Daniel J. Weiss

Simple acts of picking up a water glass or turning a handle are the product of multilayered cognitive plans and sophisticated neural computations.


New Twists in Earth's Radiation Belts

Daniel Baker

Rings of high-energy particles encircling our planet change more than researchers realized. Those variations could amplify damage from solar storms


Quietest Places in the World

Trevor Cox

The author’s search for extreme silence leads to remote deserts, secluded forests, and into an artificial environment so noise-free it is unbearable.


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

The Cheese Plate Stands Alone

Emily Buehler

A review of The Science of Cheese, by Michael H. Tunick

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

FROM THE EDITORS

In Memory of Austin Green

Fenella Saunders

TECHNOLOGUE

Why Is It So Hard to Stop Sports Concussions?

Human behavior conspires with the complex mechanics of head impacts to keep injury rates high. New helmet technology could help.

Stephen Piazza

PERSPECTIVE

The Superorganism Revolution

The bacteria living on and in us are challenging paradigms in community ecology.

Robert Dorit

ENGINEERING

Aspirants, Apprentices, and Student Engineers*

From the construction of the Erie Canal to now, companies and schools have tried many creative ways to find enough skilled and professional workers.

Henry Petroski

COMPUTING SCIENCE

Pencil, Paper, and Pi

A gargantuan calculation of pi in the 1850s ran up against the limits of manual arithmetic; figuring out where it went wrong calls for forensic mathematics.

Brian Hayes

ARTS LAB

Etching the Neural Landscape

A neuroscientist-artist draws inspiration from the materials and techniques of Asian scroll painting to visualize the complex wiring of the brain.

Greg Dunn

Click to Enlarge Image

SIGHTINGS

Paleontology’s X-ray Excavations

Digital scans and computer-aided visualizations are liberating ancient life from stone.

Catherine Clabby

2014-09SightingsF1.jpgClick to Enlarge Image

SLIDE SHOW

Bringing Ancient Flora to Life with X-ray Technology

This issue's Sightings column features digital scans and computer-aided visualizations of late Jurassic Period flora. View a slide show of the interior of rare seed cone fossils from the Morrison Formation in Utah.

Catherine Clabby

2014-09SightingsF2.jpgClick to Enlarge Image

SPOTLIGHT

New Information from Ancient Genomes

High-tech sequencing teams up with creative scientific thinking to help resolve a few nagging questions from prehistoric times.

Sandra J. Ackerman

First Person: Joan Strassmann

Surprising altruism and other cooperative behaviors exist in the microbial world.

Katie L. Burke

Briefings

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

Fishy Succession

Neural Networking

Chew the Fat


SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


Subscribe to American Scientist