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On the Cover

September-October 2013 Volume 101, Number 5

What looks like an intricate flower is actually a natural ice structure. Conditions must be just right for such "ice flowers" to form: The air has to be.... 


FEATURE ARTICLES

Lifelong Impact of Early Self-Control *

Terrie Moffitt, Richie Poulton, Avshalom Caspi

Childhood self-discipline predicts adult quality of life.


Flowers and Ribbons of Ice

James R. Carter

Ice flowers are formed from water exuding out of the plant’s stem

Beautiful, gravity-defying structures can form when water freezes under the right conditions


Digital Forensics

Simson L. Garfinkel

An analyst uses a Faraday cage to work on a cell pone

Modern crime often leaves an electronic trail. Finding and preserving that evidence requires careful methods as well as technical skill


Citizen Science Takes Root

Kayri Havens, Sandra Henderson

Building on a long tradition, amateur naturalists are gathering data for understanding both seasonal events and the effects of climate change.


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

The Life of a Star

Fenella Saunders

A review of STEPHEN HAWKING: Riddles of Time and Space, by Michael Lent and Brian McCarthy, with art by Zach Bassett

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

FROM THE EDITORS

Keep Your Eyes Open

Fenella Saunders

MACROSCOPE

Will AC Put a Chill on the Global Energy Supply

Several developing nations could soon lead the world in use of air-conditioning

Michael Sivak

ENGINEERING

The Evolution of Eyeglasses *

Applying the principles of optics to a basic human need required both imagination and skill

Henry Petroski

COMPUTING SCIENCE

The Math of Segregation

Even in a computer model, racial divisions are not all black and white

Brian Hayes

MARGINALIA

Making Life from Scratch

Artificial intelligence is not human intelligence, nor is synthetic life the same as life with evolutionary history

Robert L. Dorit

TECHNOLOGUE

These 'Bots Are Made for Walking

Patients with disabilities are learning to regain skills with the assistance of smart machines

Stephen Piazza

EARTH ART

Regeneration on Tree Mountain

Fusing artful beauty with functional utility could help heal the environment, and restore our humanness

Robert Louis Chianese

SIGHTINGS

Blood in Motion

Applied mathematician George Karniadakis models how diseases alter the body’s circulation

Catherine Clabby

Click to Enlarge Image

SCIENCE OBSERVER

Night Shift Belly

Disruption of sleep-wake cycles damages the intestinal wall and promotes inflammatory disease

Jenny Jennings Foerst

Pulling On the Shade

Transparent, liquid-filled films become opaque when stretched

Fenella Saunders

In the News

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

Dim and Dimmer

Bridging the Gap

Plant Parts

Statistically Speaking

SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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