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On the Cover

March-April 2013 Volume 101, Number 2

Abstract mathematical surfaces can be hard to visualize -- but they are much easier to grasp mentally when they can be picked up and moved around. Mathematician sarah-marie belcastro began rendering surfaces in knitting when she was in graduate school. ...


FEATURE ARTICLES

Not Just Going with the Flow *

Frank Fish, George Lauder

Aquatic animals can modify their fluid environment to improve efficiency


Adventures in Mathematical Knitting

sarah-marie belcastro

Rendering mathematical surfaces and objects in tactile form requires both time and creativity


Athletics and Herbal Supplements

David Senchina

Do current products enhance athletes’ health and performance?


* access restricted to members and subscribers


SCIENTISTS’ BOOKSHELF

Sparring with the Great Geometer

Brian Hayes

A review of The King of Infinite Space: Euclid and His Elements, by David Berlinski. “Berlinski offers a meditative monologue on Euclid’s place in the history of mathematics and the history of ideas,” says Hayes

See all book reviews for this issue.


DEPARTMENTS

FROM THE EDITOR

Opportunity Calling

Interacting with readers and authors

David Schoonmaker

MACROSCOPE

The Music of Math Games

Video games that provide good mathematics learning should look to the piano as a model

Keith Devlin

COMPUTING SCIENCE

First Links in the Markov Chain

Probability and poetry were unlikely partners in the creation of a computational tool

Brian Hayes

MARGINALIA

Mining the Boreal North

Resource extraction decisions are not simply about wilderness preservation or development

Nancy Langston

ENGINEERING

An Anthropomorphic Model*

If seeing is believing, feeling may be understanding

Henry Petroski

POETRY

Among Cosmologists

Emily Grosholz

EARTH ART

The Umbrellas

Earth art, even when removed, can indelibly change nature in the mind's eye

Robert Louis Chianese

SIGHTINGS

A New Looking Glass: Historic Harvard Plates

Photographic plates of astronomical images provide data to researchers in the present

Catherine Clabby

SCIENCE OBSERVER

The Beetle Breaking Point

A novel limit controls the size of an animal weapon, the beetle horn

Katie L. Burke

Elemental Energy

New polymers get their power from moisture

Fenella Saunders

In the News

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

The Smallest Cell

A Colorful History

Significance of Significance

Chemistry Fix

Mapping Traditions

SIGMA XI TODAY (PDF)


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