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FEATURE ARTICLE

The Ecology of Lyme-Disease Risk

Complex interactions between seemingly unconnected phenomena determine risk of exposure to this expanding disease

Richard Ostfeld

Acknowledgment

The author wishes to thank coworkers Charles Canham, Clive Jones, Felicia Keesing, Gary Lovett, Eric Schauber, Peter Turchin and Jerry Wolff for valuable discussions and assistance. Help from students and field assistants Obed Cepeda, Kirsten Hazler, Lance Hebdon, Michael Miller and Jaclyn Schnurr was invaluable. Editorial and conceptual suggestions by Durland Fish, Michelle Hoffman and Felicia Keesing improved the manuscript greatly. The National Science Foundation (DEB 9416340 and DEB 9615414), the National Institutes of Health (R01 AI40076) and the General Reinsurance Corporation provided financial support. This is a contribution to the program of the Institute of Ecosystem Studies.

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