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Graphene in High-Frequency Electronics

This two-dimensional form of carbon has properties not seen in any other substance

Keith A. Jenkins

The subject of the Nobel prize in physics in 2010 was a material that has been in plain sight for many years. Graphene is a form of carbon that looks like chicken wire—it is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in rings. But its ability to quickly move around electrons has made it a contender to replace silicon in some ever-shrinking electronics. Jenkins describes the work he and his colleagues have done to mass-produce enough graphene to work with, and to develop it into specialized integrated circuits for applications such as components of wireless communications networks.


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