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FEATURE ARTICLE

Rocket Science and Russian Spies

During the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, the race to develop solid-fueled rockets involved secrecy, explosions and espionage

Joseph Castellano

Fig.%201.%20The%20Cold%20War%20.%20.%20.Click to Enlarge ImageDuring the Cold War in the 1960s, the U.S. had a number of secret programs that were of interest to the Soviet Union. One of these was a rocket fuel research facility where Castellano, now a retired chemist, held one of his first jobs in industry. He worked with a young Russian man who simply disappeared one day. Forty years later, Castellano discovered that there was evidence that someone with a similar name to the Russian man had been found to be a Soviet spy. He undertook a long search to figure out if it was the same person he had worked with, and what happened to the man. The detective story also covers a surprising twist in the type of uses in which substances similar to the experimental rocket fuel now seems to be most promising.


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