MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
RSS
Logo IMG
HOME > PAST ISSUE > COMMENTS

Abstract Science?


Comments


It is easily argued that all evolutionary process develops out of 'the _relational_ properties of matter' -uniquely human 'deliberative capability', the most 'sophisticated' of such evolution.

I suggest further that art and mathematics are intimately related and _intrinsic_ of deliberative capability by fact of its _open-ended-ness_ in assimilation of successively higher-order relationals.
As elements in such argument, I call your attention to website Godel's Proof and The Human Condition (thread below), to the music of Kristoff Penderecki (De Natura Sonoris), and to the poem-

Sunflower

Sunflower runs clockwise
-and counter-clockwise -
'Fibonacci n' one direction
'n+1' the other -.
-Stands tall and
gold-smiling too!

The ways of God are
many -and beautiful, but
Sunflowers will undo him.

Links to all of the above and more are more or less directly accessible thru the essay-

Human Nature and Continuing Human Existence
http://www.condition.org/humexis.htm
posted by Perry Bezanis
November 13, 2009 @ 12:06 PM

 

Read Us on JSTOR

JSTOR, the online academic archive, now contains complete back issues of American Scientist from its inception in 1913 (as Sigma Xi Quarterly) through 2005.

The table of contents for each issue is freely available to all users; those with institutional access can read each complete issue.

View the full collection here.


Indexes

Year-end indexes in PDF format:

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010


Subscribe to Free eNewsletters!

  • Sigma Xi SmartBrief:

    A free daily summary of the latest news in scientific research. Each story is summarized concisely and linked directly to the original source for further reading.

  • American Scientist Update

  • An early peek at each new issue, with descriptions of feature articles, columns, Science Observers and more. Every other issue contains links to everything in the latest issue's table of contents.

  • Scientists' Nightstand

  • News of book reviews published in American Scientist and around the web, as well as other noteworthy happenings in the world of science books.

    To sign up for automatic emails of the American Scientist Update and Scientists' Nightstand issues, create an online profile, then sign up in the My AmSci area.


Write for American Scientist

Review our submission guidelines.


Subscribe to American Scientist