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HOME > ON THE BOOKSHELF > COMMENTS

A Note from the Editors


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Dear Drs. Phillips and Schoonmaker!

Having just read your sad note about the closing down of the valuable Bookshelf section of AmSci, I should like to tell you that I highly regret your decision. I'm a German subscriber and read AmSci since the early 1990s. Besides certain regular columns, such as Brian Hayes' and Henry Petroski's, "Scientist's Bookshelf" was the main reason for first buying and later subscribing to AmSci.

The different cultures of writing science books in Europe and the US made the reviews especially valuable for me and I guess for many other non-US readers, particularly if they are written in such detail and quality as in AmSci.

Whatever led to your decision that appears irreversible, I very much should like to see a kind of online subscription of _well-selected_ book reviews that comply with the high standards of the reviews I enjoyed reading in AmSci. The present online subscription of book recommendations doesn't really help. Too many publications are presented in a confusing layout and it takes too much time to access the original sites that hopefully provide free access... The idea of recommending sites with information about science books isn't an alternative because it requires regular action: As a customer who pays for information (AmSci subscription) I expect to see some service and not to find advice of how to search for information myself.

I wish you would reconsider your decision but know that you've done it several times...

With very kind regards

Helmut Gluender
posted by Helmut Gluender
March 19, 2013 @ 2:54 PM

 

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