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Brains Like To Keep It Real


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have a question.....good article, good quotes
....my q is this

what IF, what is reading on paper is superior brain-chemistry wise to
reading pixels off screens? what then?

my hunch is that MRI and PET scan tests will show that reading on
paper lights up different regions of the
brain compared to reading off screens and that these paper reading
regions are SUPERIOR For

processing info
retention
analysis
critical thinking

What say YOU?

is anyone you know doing this kind of (f)MRI or PET scan reserach on
this very issue yet?

Dan Bloom, Tufts 1971, researcher in Taiwan




re

Maybe the physical book/magazine/newspaper also affects the brain
differently. If only paper-based media can convince advertisers it's
so!
posted by daniel bloom
November 9, 2010 @ 9:39 PM


Chris, good post and thanks for links. One thing, Shirky's piece is NOT an editorial. That is his blog, it is a blog post. An editorial is a newspaper's corporate unsigned opinion about something or other. A lot of people go around calling articles and letters and blog posts as editorials, they are not editorials. when you call that an editorial, it makes you look journalistscally illiterate,. Look it up, Chris, It's important to know your terms.
posted by daniel bloom
November 9, 2010 @ 9:43 PM

 

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