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Is String Theory Even Wrong?


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Although mathematical unification of fields has failed physical unification already exists in the form of electrons and other particles. The electromagnetic and gravitational fields coexist harmoniously within these particles and are superposed in four-dimensional space without influencing each other. In other words, they are unified by particle structure, but are manifested and experienced independently. To attempt to unify fields by only looking at their external properties, which behave independently, ignores this common origin. Instead we must seek a solution by taking the opposite viewpoint and asking, Why do fields that have the same physical origin interact according to completely distinct laws? To be sure a successful field theory must account for the many complexities of fields, but more importantly it must explain how this complexity can arise from simple structures. Thus the key to understanding particles lies in correctly interpreting the field source.

posted by Richard Oldani
June 19, 2008

 

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