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Do I See What You See?


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Lurz’s “logical problem” applies also to my attribution of consciousness to fellow humans, but "economy of explanation" does not deny it to them because, having found consciousness necessary to explain my own experience, it would be wasteful of me not to use it also to help explain the behaviour of others (even though, in my absence it may not have been necessary and so might have properly been ruled out).

And by the same token, it is at least as economical to attribute animal behaviours that give the appearance of being conscious to something similar to what happens in human minds rather than to something completely different.

posted by Alan Cooper
February 21, 2012

 

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