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HOME > PAST ISSUE > COMMENTS > Comment Detail

When Scientists Choose Motherhood


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This is an excellent article pointing out the challenges faced by young women who wish to make a career in science and engineering. Diversity is missing in academic institutions around the world. In India, if we look at the top academic institutions like the Indian Institute of Science and the six major Indian Institutes of Technology (Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kanpur, Kharagpur and Guwahati) there are only 11 women faculty in a total of 235 in chemistry with none at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore and Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. The number is probably not very different in other disciplines. These institutions are the premier institutions of the country and the percentage of women graduating with a PhD degree from these institutions could be as high as 25.
The choice for women scientists is between having a successful career in academics and a normal family life. Option of having both is not given to them at all which is unfortunate.

posted by Sheela R
February 20, 2012

 

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