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Behaviorism at 100


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What a shame.

The article could have outlined the unique philosophical position of (radical) behaviorism, the far-reach practical success its applications have enjoyed (applied behavior analysis), and the burgeoning laboratory analysis of complex human behavior, such as language and cognition.

Instead, the vast majority of the article is concerned with presenting a niche area (so niche that there is not even a special interest group of the Association for Behavior Analysis International dedicated to it).

It is also noteworthy that the authors cites his own work on behaviorology (Fraley & Ledoux, 2002) in the References section.

And, on a final note, the example of equivalence relations is, in fact, more akin to transitivity, which may be explained by recourse to lower level, associative-like processes.

posted by Simon Dymond
December 14, 2011

 

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