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HOME > ON THE BOOKSHELF > COMMENTS > Comment Detail

An interview with Leonard Susskind


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I disagree on "it's not that the universe is somehow contorting itself to accommodate us; it's just a diverse place".
Dear Susskind, there are too many unnecessary things? "Fifth wheel" things? Indeed, supposed mankind can survive without: Saturn, the Moon, without Galileo comet, fearful asteroid Apophis, extrasolar planet 581c, war in Iraq, paralyzed Stephen. Mankind can survive without Jews - taught Adolf Hitler. But where man is surrounded solely by only beneficial things? It's in the mental hospital, the known room with walls of soft material. Is such patient free and loves attendants twisting him? Jesus Christ loves us, so trusted us the freedom. As free, I produced musical "Musical on LHC Large Hadron Collider safety falloff" on youtube. PS. We can not survive without paralyzed Stephen. Army do not leave its soldiers.

posted by Dmitri Martila
March 30, 2010

 

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