Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > PAST ISSUE > COMMENTS > Comment Detail

How Do Scientists Really Use Computers?


Comment

Version control is not just a collaboration tool. It's other main benefit is that it gives you complete undo back to any previous state of your software. If you are doing exploratory research, that could be very helpful. You can try changing pretty much anything, no matter how risky, because if you find it is not working out you can just discard that branch, go back, and try something else. Of course, you could manually keep backup copies, providing you remember to do one before each set of changes - but really that is what version control does for you. It automatically keeps every version of your software for you with minimal hassle.

The most powerful tool for 'ensur[ing] that software is correct' would be unit testing. Something that might be quite easy to apply to a lot of scientific programs. Certainly something that can easily be taught in a programming course.

Tim - who comes from the professional software development side of things. Thanks for an interesting article.

posted by Tim Hunt
August 8, 2009

 

Read Us on JSTOR

JSTOR, the online academic archive, now contains complete back issues of American Scientist from its inception in 1913 (as Sigma Xi Quarterly) through 2005.

The table of contents for each issue is freely available to all users; those with institutional access can read each complete issue.

View the full collection here.


Indexes

Year-end indexes in PDF format:

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010


Subscribe to Free eNewsletters!

  • Sigma Xi SmartBrief:

    A free daily summary of the latest news in scientific research. Each story is summarized concisely and linked directly to the original source for further reading.

  • American Scientist Update

  • An early peek at each new issue, with descriptions of feature articles, columns, Science Observers and more. Every other issue contains links to everything in the latest issue's table of contents.

  • Scientists' Nightstand

  • News of book reviews published in American Scientist and around the web, as well as other noteworthy happenings in the world of science books.

    To sign up for automatic emails of the American Scientist Update and Scientists' Nightstand issues, create an online profile, then sign up in the My AmSci area.


Write for American Scientist

Review our submission guidelines.


Subscribe to American Scientist