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BOOK REVIEW

The Universe on Your Coffee Table

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The Hubble Space Telescope keeps taking snapshots of the cosmos, and we continue to learn more from them, so it was only a matter of time before science journalist Carolyn Collins Petersen and astronomer John C. Brandt issued a second edition of their popular 1995 book. Hubble Vision: Further Adventures with the Hubble Space Telescope (Cambridge, $39.95) features an extended glossary and remains an out-of-this-world eye-feast: (left) the Christmas Tree nebula; (near right) the faint blue stars at the core of globular cluster M15; and (facing page, left) the Cartwheel, a galaxy with a ring of newly formed stars, plus (far right) an artist’s conception of the giant comet-like gas clouds thought to be traversing the galaxy.

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