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BOOK REVIEW

Mistakes on the Lake

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Pulp mills pump hazardous effluent into Lake Superior; their sludge incinerators befoul the air. The lake is vulnerable to a less obvious threat a thousand miles away, in Washington. Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, to which Chapel Rock belongs, was included in a package of national parklands Congress attempted to sell off in the mid-1990s, recount nature photographer/writers John and Ann Mahan in Lake Superior: Story and Spirit (Sweetwater Visions, $56). They have produced a sweeping limnography of the greatest of the Great Lakes, a brainy coffee-table book with an attitude. Never shying away from complex natural science or environmental controversy, the Mahans punctuate a full story of Superior’s lore and fragile ecosystem with their stunning photographs of its majesty. For anyone planning to visit the region this summer, Lake Superior offers an antidote to the puffy stuff preferred by tourism bureaus.


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