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HOME > ON THE BOOKSHELF > BROWSE BOOKSHELF BY ISSUE

Volume 100 | Number 6 | November-December 2012


Conservation for the Win

Daniel Simberloff

A review of Wild Hope: On the Front Lines of Conservation Success, by Andrew Balmford. Balmford presents seven conservation efforts that are working, says Simberloff, primarily because they begin by trying to understand the human actors involved

A Tale of Tales

Michael Bérubé

A review of The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human, by Jonathan Gottschall. Evolutionary biology and neuroscience may have lessons for the study of literature, says Bérubé, but thus far the concept is not entirely convincing

A History of Racket-Making

Peter Pesic

A review of Discord: The Story of Noise, by Mike Goldsmith. This social history of noise tells the story of the phenomenon from the Big Bang to the present

King Solomon Revisited

William A. Searcy

A review of Calls Beyond Our Hearing: Unlocking the Secrets of Animal Voices, by Holly Menino. Menino’s recounting of various research on animal vocalizations is a pleasure to read, but the scientific explanations don’t all pass muster, says Searcy

Online Optimism

Jacqueline Olds

A review of Networked: The New Social Operating System, by Lee Rainie and Barry Wellman. Drawing on research from the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life project, the authors provide suggestions for how to thrive as “networked individuals”

Dreamland

Katie L. Burke

A brief review of Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep, by David K. Randall

Beautiful Corn

Anna Lena Phillips

A brief review of Beautiful Corn: America’s Original Grain from Seed to Plate, by Anthony Boutard

Sex, Genes and Arms Control

Anna Lena Phillips

Our review of reviews published during the first 100 years of the Scientists’ Bookshelf continues, with content ranging from landscape architecture to clouds to alternative energy

Sex Is for Real

Mary S. Calderone

A 1969 review of Sex Is for Real (Human Sexuality & Sexual Responsibility), by W. Dalrymple

Mathematical Models of Arms Control and Disarmament

Gerald H. Kramer

A 1969 review of Mathematical Models of Arms Control & Disarmament: Application of Mathematical Structures to Politics, by T. L. Saaty


Total Records : 19


 

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