Subscribe
Subscribe
MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
Logo IMG
HOME > SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND > BROWSE SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND BY ISSUE

Volume 99 | Number 1 | January-February 2011


Unraveling the Significance of Childhood

Michael E. Lamb

A review of The Evolution of Childhood: Relationships, Emotion, Mind, by Melvin Konner. Konner's new, nearly encyclopedic book is masterfully written, says Lamb

A Tale of Vectors, Viruses and Victims

David Arnold

A review of Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620–1914, by J. R. McNeill. McNeill demonstrates that differential immunity to mosquito-borne diseases such as yellow fever and malaria played an important role in the military and political history of the Greater Caribbean

Atomic Escapism?

Hugh Gusterson

A review of Atomic Obsession: Nuclear Alarmism From Hiroshima to al-Qaeda, by John Mueller. Readers of all political persuasions will find things to be annoyed at in Mueller’s argument that both the dangers and the importance of nuclear weapons have been exaggerated

At the Cutting Edge of Human Adaptation

Melvin Konner

A review of The Hadza: Hunter-Gatherers of Tanzania, by Frank W. Marlowe, and Life Histories of the Dobe !Kung: Food, Fatness, and Well-Being Over the Life-Span, by Nancy Howell. These superb books tell us much about what it is like to live by foraging for wild food on an open plain in a warm climate

Fenceline Patrol

Lauren Byrnes, Sara Mele, Daniel Faber

A review of Sacrifice Zones: The Front Lines of Toxic Chemical Exposure in the United States, by Steve Lerner. Lerner describes 12 communities whose residents, plagued by pollution from some of the most environmentally hazardous sites and facilities in the United States, are fighting for their right to a clean and healthy environment

Machines, Minds and Madness

Brian Hayes

A review of The Cybernetic Brain: Sketches of Another Future, by Andrew Pickering. Pickering has deeply engaging stories to tell about the lives and work of six men who were key members of the British cybernetics community

A Fantasy Future

David Satterthwaite

A review of Climatopolis: How Our Cities Will Thrive in the Hotter Future, by Matthew E. Kahn. Kahn is confident that market forces, human ingenuity and economic growth will support adaptation to climate change and has little use for the idea that government could have a constructive role to play

Crossing the Danube

Peter Pesic

A review of Dance of the Photons: From Einstein to Quantum Teleportation, by Anton Zeilinger. In a tour de force of exposition, Zeilinger explains with verve and charm how quantum effects are made visible and measurable in experiments

Of Birds and Bureaucracy

Jared Farmer

A review of Seeking Refuge: Birds and Landscapes of the Pacific Flyway, by Robert M. Wilson. Wilson recounts the history of governmental efforts to provide wetlands where birds can sojourn during migration

Speaking for the Data

Elsa Youngsteadt

A review of Escape from the Ivory Tower: A Guide to Making Your Science Matter, by Nancy Baron, and Explaining Research: How to Reach Key Audiences to Advance Your Work, by Dennis Meredith. Baron and Meredith offer tips for scientists wanting to improve their ability to explain and promote their research


Total Records : 12


 

Connect With Us:

Facebook Icon Sm Twitter Icon Google+ Icon Pinterest Icon RSS Feed

Sigma Xi/Amazon Smile (SciNight)


Subscribe to Free eNewsletters!

  • American Scientist Update

  • An early peek at each new issue, with descriptions of feature articles, columns, and more. Every other issue contains links to everything in the latest issue's table of contents.

  • Scientists' Nightstand

  • News of book reviews published in American Scientist and around the web, as well as other noteworthy happenings in the world of science books.

    To sign up for automatic emails of the American Scientist Update and Scientists' Nightstand issues, create an online profile, then sign up in the My AmSci area.


RSS Feed Subscription

Receive notification when new content is posted from the entire website, or choose from the customized feeds available.


Read Past Issues on JSTOR

JSTOR, the online academic archive, contains complete back issues of American Scientist from 1913 (known then as the Sigma Xi Quarterly) through 2005.

The table of contents for each issue is freely available to all users; those with institutional access can read each complete issue.

View the full collection here.


Subscribe to American Scientist