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Volume 94 | Number 6 | November-December 2006


Bones of Contention?

Jeffrey McKee

A review of The First Human: The Race to Discover Our Earliest Ancestors, by Ann Gibbons. The attention given to high-profile animosities among paleoanthropologists obscures the fact that cooperation is just as prevalent as competition

The Secret History of Mathematicians

Daniel Silver

A review of Arthur Cayley: Mathematician Laureate of the Victorian Age, by Tony Crilly, and James Joseph Sylvester, by Karen Hunger Parshall. For a time, these highly regarded mathematicians of 19th-century Britain, pioneers in the development of linear algebra, had day jobs as lawyers

The Dirt on Coal

David Orr

A review of Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness, by Erik Reece. According to Reece, mountaintop-removal mining has had a devastating effect on communities and ecosystems in Appalachia

On the Perils of Publishing

Bettyann Kevles

A review of The Reluctant Mr. Darwin: An Intimate Portrait of Charles Darwin and the Making of His Theory of Evolution, by David Quammen. In this concise biography, acclaimed science writer David Quammen examines why it took Darwin so long to publish his revolutionary ideas

The Dark Side of DNA

Fred Gould

A review of Genes in Conflict, by Austin Burt and Robert Trivers. It may be a surprise to most people to learn that their bodies host parasitic DNA

Remembrance of Things Past

Larry Squire

A review of In Search of Memory, by Eric R. Kandel. The scientific memoir of a Nobel laureate reveals how the study of psychology in the wake of Freud gave way to a focus on the various cellular and molecular mechanisms operating in the brain

Short takes on three books

David Schneider

Math Envy

James Bower

A review of 23 Problems in Systems Neuroscience, edited by J. Leo van Hemmen and Terrence J. Sejnowski. A century after David Hilbert outlined essential unsolved problems in mathematics, a number of prominent neuroscientists attempt to do the same for future studies of the brain

The Fault, Dear Brutus . . .

David Hart

A review of Technology Matters: Questions to Live With, by David E. Nye. An enlightening—and maddening—text that introduces some of the most important debates in the field of history of technology

The Skeptical Inquirer

Ryan Tweney

A review of The Psychology of Science and the Origins of the Scientific Mind, by Gregory J. Feist. This rich and diverse book makes a strong case for developing the field of psychology of science


Total Records : 12


 

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