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Volume 94 | Number 5 | September-October 2006


A Backward Look at Modern Algebra

Judith Grabiner

A review of Unknown Quantity: A Real and Imaginary History of Algebra, by John Derbyshire. An amusing, but too often misleading, account of the basic algebraic ideas and the historical relations among them

A Look at the Entire Human Past

Craig Stanford

A review of Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors, by Nicholas Wade. An overview of what we know about the record of ancestry and ethnicity that stretches from us back to the people of the Neolithic


Total Records : 12


 

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