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HOME > SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND > BROWSE SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND BY ISSUE

Volume 91 | Number 3 | May-June 2003


King of Swing

Mike Eisenberg

Greg Frederickson's Hinged Dissections is a book for geometers—a meditation on the fun of playing with pictures

On Shaky Ground

Mark Zoback

In Earthshaking Science, Susan Hough explains current earthquake research and controversies to the lay reader

Think Nonlocally

Wim van Dam

Amir Aczel's Entanglement chronicles the history of work on nonlocal interactions and paints a lively picture of the participants

Resistance Is Feudal

Brian Hayes

Nicols Fox's Against the Machine applauds those who have gone cold turkey on technology. But what happens if we all follow suit?


Total Records : 14


 

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