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Volume 91 | Number 4 | July-August 2003


Ooze Clues

Jason Dworkin

A review of Life's Origin: The Beginnings of Biological Evolution, edited by J. William Schopf.

Making Connections

Prabhakar Raghavan

A review of Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age, by Duncan J. Watts.

Industrial Revolutionaries

Trevor Levere

Erasmus Darwin, Joseph Priestley and James Watt are among the energetic entrepreneurs at the center of Jenny Uglow’s The Lunar Men

A Matter of Life and Death

Christian de Duve

The most interesting thing about Nick Lane’s Oxygen, says reviewer Christian de Duve, is that it rejects the “oxygen holocaust” theory

Double Take on the Double Helix

Jon Beckwith

On the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the structure of DNA, James D. Watson's new book DNA: The Secret of Life and Victor K. McElheny's biography Watson and DNA: Making a Scienific Revolution help us gauge the man and his impact on biology.


Total Records : 15


 

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