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HOME > SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND > BROWSE SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND BY ISSUE

Volume 88 | Number 3 | May-June 2000


More Deep Thoughts from Robert Ballard

Richard Strickland

A review of The Eternal Darkness: A Personal History of Deep-Sea Exploration, by Robert D. Ballard with Will Hively.

Salmon: an Environmental Tragedy in Two Acts

William Dietrich

A review of Salmon Without Rivers: A History of the Pacific Salmon Crisis, by Jim Lichatowich and

Bugs in the Courtroom: Excerpts from A Fly for the Prosecution and Millions of Monarchs, Bunches of Beetles

An Engrossing Primer on Xenotransplantation

Harold Vanderpool

A review of XENO: The Promise of Transplanting Animal Organs Into Humans, by David K. C. Cooper and Robert P. Lanza.

Design Flaw

Norman Johnson

A review of Intelligent Design: The Bridge Between Science & Theology, by William A. Dembski and

India's About-face

David Morrison

A review of India's Nuclear Bomb: Impact on Global Proliferation, by George Perkovich.

Meaningful Byproducts

G. William Domhoff

A review of Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind, by Owen Flanagan.

Hot Spots

James Case

A review of Windows Into the Earth: The Geologic Story of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, by Robert B. Smith and Lee J. Siegel.


Total Records : 15


 

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