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HOME > SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND > BROWSE SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND BY ISSUE

Volume 90 | Number 1 | January-February 2002


Quantizing the Universe

Paul Renteln

A review of Three Roads to Quantum Gravity, by Lee Smolin

Science Peace?

Jan Golinski

A review of The One Culture? A Conversation about Science, edited by Jay A. Labinger and Harry Collins

The Peerless Puzzlemaker

Dennis Flanagan

A review of The Colossal Book of Mathematics: Classic Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Problems, by Martin Gardner

Well Connected

John Horn

A review of Synapses, by W. Maxwell Cowan, Thomas C. Südhof and Charles F. Stevens

Making Babies, The Science Book, and more...

Challenging Times Ahead

Brian Skinner

A review of Hubbert's Peak: The Impending World Oil Shortage, by Kenneth S. Deffeyes

Prime Time

Stan Wagon

A review of Prime Numbers: A Computational Perspective, by Richard Crandall and Carl Pomerance


Total Records : 17


 

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