MY AMERICAN SCIENTIST
LOG IN! REGISTER!
SEARCH
 
RSS
Logo IMG
HOME > ON THE BOOKSHELF > BROWSE BOOKSHELF BY PUBLICATION TYPE

Book Review


A Portrait of the Economy

Brian Hayes

A review of Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius, by Sylvia Nasar. This work is essentially a biography of economics, says Hayes. Nasar reveals the history and the nature of the field through captivating portraits of economists

Save to Library

Trouble at the Back End

Allison Macfarlane

A review of Fuel Cycle to Nowhere: U.S. Law and Policy on Nuclear Waste, by Richard Burleson Stewart and Jane Bloom Stewart. This comprehensive book details efforts to manage nuclear waste in the United States and, in doing so, offers useful lessons for policy makers and the public

Save to Library

Mathematical Road Trips

Brian Hayes

A review of In Pursuit of the Traveling Salesman: Mathematics at the Limits of Computation, by William J. Cook. The traveling salesman problem falls into that set of mathematical problems that are very difficult, but not impossible, to solve, says Hayes. This book celebrates its idiosyncrasies

Save to Library

Insect Escape Artists

Elsa Youngsteadt

A review of How Not to Be Eaten: The Insects Fight Back, by Gilbert Waldbauer. Waldbauer has written another book that delights in the intricacies of the insect world. Seasoned entomologists will find no revelations here, says Youngsteadt, but the book may help convince their friends and family members of the wonders of the field

Save to Library

A “Simple” Piece of Plastic

Emily Willingham

A review of The Global Politics of the IUD: How Science Constructs Contraceptive Users and Women’s Bodies, by Chikako Takeshita. The scientific and social history of the group of birth-control devices known as IUDs (intrauterine devices) is fraught with instances of design under- or uninformed by empirical knowledge of how IUDs work and even of how the uterus is shaped, says Takeshita

Save to Library

Turning Scientific Perplexity into Ordinary Statistical Uncertainty

Cosma Shalizi

A review of Principles of Applied Statistics, by D. R. Cox and Christl A. Donnelly. Cox and Donnelly’s book “stands as a summary of an entire tradition of using statistics to address scientific problems,” says Shalizi. The lessons the book contains will allow those entering the field to “make original mistakes”

Save to Library

Science and Poetry

Anna Lena Phillips

In this special review section, we consider recent poetry collections that engage with science and mathematics—and offer a few poems as well

Save to Library

Poetry in the Wild

Emily Grosholz

A review of Approaching Ice: Poems, by Elizabeth Bradfield, and Darwin: A Life in Poems, by Ruth Padel. Scenes from the history of science are rendered in these two well-referenced collections. One offers glimpses into the lives of a plenitude of polar explorers, the other a verse biography of Charles Darwin

Save to Library

Quantum Metaphors

Robin Chapman

A review of Intersecting Sets: A Poet Looks at Science, by Alice Major. What might a poet who has devoted much time to the consideration of science have to say about these two disciplines? Plenty, it turns out: “Major offers us the pleasure of watching another writer’s mind in motion at every scale,” says Chapman

Save to Library


Total Records : 1221


 

Connect With Us:

    Pinterest Icon Google+ Icon Twitter Icon Facebook Icon Sm


Pizza Lunch Podcasts

African Penguins"Penguins are 10 times older than humans and have been here for a very, very long time," said Daniel Ksepka, Ph.D., a North Carolina State University research assistant professor. Dr. Ksepka researches the evolution of penguins and how they came to inhabit the African continent.

Because penguins have been around for over 60 million years, their fossil record is extensive. Fossils that Dr. Ksepka and his colleagues have discovered provide clues about migration patterns and the diversity of penguin species.

Click the Title to view all of our Pizza Lunch Podcasts!


Subscribe to Free eNewsletters!

  • Sigma Xi SmartBrief:

    A free daily summary of the latest news in scientific research. Each story is summarized concisely and linked directly to the original source for further reading.

  • American Scientist Update

  • An early peek at each new issue, with descriptions of feature articles, columns, Science Observers and more. Every other issue contains links to everything in the latest issue's table of contents.

  • Scientists' Nightstand

  • News of book reviews published in American Scientist and around the web, as well as other noteworthy happenings in the world of science books.

    To sign up for automatic emails of the American Scientist Update and Scientists' Nightstand issues, create an online profile, then sign up in the My AmSci area.


Subscribe to American Scientist