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HOME > SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND > BROWSE SCIENTISTS' NIGHTSTAND BY PUBLICATION TYPE

Book Review


Skeleton Key

Clark Larsen

A review of Bones of the Maya: Studies of Ancient Skeletons, edited by Stephen L. Whittington and David M. Reed.

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After-School Detention

Patricia Galloway

A review of The Cultural Transformation of a Native American Family and Its Tribe, 1763–1995: A Basket of Apples, by Joel Spring.

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Trials of Errors

Malcolm Sherman

A review of Yes, We Have No Neutrons: An Eye-Opening Tour Through the Twists and Turns of Bad Science, by A. K. Dewdney.

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Graphic Language

John Russ

A review of Number by Colors: A Guide to Using Color to Understand Technical Data, by Brand Fortner and Theodore E. Meyer.

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Slick Account

Robert Gramling

A review of Oil Spills, by Joanna Burger.

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Through the Spectroscope

Juliette Ioup, George Ioup

A review of Deconvolution of Images and Spectra, second edition, edited by Peter A. Jansson.

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Vive La Revolution

David Knight

A review of Lavoisier: Chemist, Biologist, Economist, by Jean-Pierre Poirier; tr. Rebecca Balinski.

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Bak to Basics

Thomas Traut

A review of How Nature Works: The Science of Self-organized Criticality, by Per Bak.

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Someone Else's Backyard

Raymond Burby

A review of Environmentally Devastated Neighborhoods: Perceptions, Policies, and Realities, by Michael R. Greenberg and Dona Schneider.

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Paradise in Peril: Examining the Interaction of People and Biota

Ian Tattersall

A review of Natural Change and Human Impact in Madagascar, edited by Steven M. Goodman and Bruce D. Patterson.

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Total Records : 1227


 

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